Futures vs. Options - Which Should You Trade? 1

Futures vs. Options – Which Should You Trade?

Digitex Futures
Trading
• Sarah Rothrie
August 5, 2019

Futures and options are both financial derivatives traded by institutions and individuals, either to turn a profit or to hedge against current investments. Some traders like to trade both, while some have a preference for one over the other. When you weigh up your own trading choices between futures vs. options, you must understand the pros and cons of each. 
That’s where we come in. In this guide, we’ll deep-dive into the features of futures and options contracts, take a look at how they originated and how today’s traders across different markets use them. We’ll also compare the opportunities and risks of both stock futures trading and options contracts and examine the current state of the crypto-derivatives markets. 

What is a Futures Contract? 

When you hear the terms “futures” and “futures contract,” they mean one and the same thing. A futures contract is a simple legal agreement between two parties that a particular asset or commodity will be sold at a pre-agreed price on a specific date in the future. 
Futures are one of the oldest forms of derivatives, and their origins offer a simple way of explaining how futures work. Futures emerged as a means of farmers hedging against the future value of their crops. At the start of the growing season, the farmers couldn’t predict whether or not they would have a good or a bad harvest, as it would depend on factors such as the weather.
Similarly, imagine a baker buying the wheat from the farmer on the other side of the transaction – they were subject to the same uncertainty. So, the farmers and the bakers would agree on a price for the harvest at the start of the season.
According to the laws of supply and demand, a good harvest would increase supply, and push down the price of the wheat. Conversely, a poor harvest creates a shortage, driving demand, and wheat prices high. By entering into a futures contract, the farmers and the bakers could hedge their overall risk by agreeing on the harvest price upfront.
Although the markets have evolved, the nature of futures contracts remains the same. Today’s futures markets consist of hedgers and speculators. Hedgers are the parties with commodities or assets to sell who want to secure an agreed price. Speculators are those trade futures contracts against the value of the asset without ever planning to take custody of the asset itself. 
The financial markets are filled with jargon, so you may come across different terms and be left wondering “what are stock futures?” or “what are forex futures?” Rest assured that the explainer given here applies to any futures market, whether the underlying asset is stocks, fiat currencies, cryptocurrencies, or commodities like oil, metals, or utilities. 
So now that you’ve had a futures contract explained, how does an options contract work? 

What is an Options Contract?

A critical difference between futures and options is that an options contract doesn’t represent a legal agreement to buy or sell. An options contract creates a right, not an obligation, to enter into a trade before a fixed date at which the contract expires. 
Options contracts are of two types. A call option is a contract that allows the trader to buy a particular asset at a fixed price, called the strike price before the contract expires. Let’s say someone opens a call option to buy BTC at $10k with an expiry date at the end of 2020.
If BTC goes up to $15k, the trader can buy the BTC at $10k and immediately sell on the open market at $15k, realizing a $5k profit on the transaction. They could also sell the option contract itself, as it already represents a profit. 
The other type of option is a put option, which works in exactly the same way except it represents a sell transaction rather than a buy transaction. 
Like futures contracts, options contracts have a long and rich history, stretching all the way back to Ancient Greece. Aristotle provides a great example of options contracts in action at the time. He wrote of a poor philosopher called Thales, who made his wealth by forecasting the future year’s olive harvest. 
Thales made agreements with the olive press owners for the option to use their olive presses at a fixed value. The next year, there was a bountiful olive harvest. Due to the increased demand for olive presses, Thales was able to sell his “olive press options” for a profit.  

What is the Difference Between Futures and Options?

So, now we’ve covered the difference between futures and options on a mechanical level, what are the differences between future and options in a trading scenario?
Buying options offer a more conservative approach to trading. When buying options, the trader can never lose more than their initial investment, known as the premium. The premium value may vary depending on the difference between the option strike price and the actual asset price and the time left before the option expiry.
Regardless of whether the asset price falls way below the premium, the trader doesn’t lose any more than this value. This applies if they can’t sell the option and choose not to exercise their right to buy. 
The option seller faces far more risk, as they must honor the agreement to sell the options at the strike price. Selling (also called writing) options can lead to very high losses in volatile markets and are best left to the most experienced institutional options traders. 
Futures represent a legally binding agreement to buy an asset; therefore, they carry more risk as the trader cannot simply choose not to fulfill the trade. Furthermore, profits and losses are directly linked to the value of the asset with no premium to offset the downside. 
Conversely, though, trading futures offers the opportunity for far higher returns than trading options. Trading futures on margin amplifies the potential for even bigger profits, and losses, with futures trading. 
Options trading can be more complicated to understand than futures trading. However, once the basics are in place, options represent a solid choice for a newer trader. Because the risk exposure on a call option is limited to the premium paid, a trader can get away with understanding less about the market itself. 
On the other hand, experienced traders who know their markets well tend to opt for futures vs. options. If you’ve spent long enough understanding the markets for a particular asset, then you’re more likely to turn a bigger profit using leveraged futures contracts than with options. 

Markets for Futures and Options

You can trade futures and options across a wide variety of markets. These include:

  • Stocks such as Apple, Google or any publicly-traded company
  • Indices such as the S&P 500 or the DJI
  • Foreign currencies
  • Commodities such as precious metals, oil, and gas, or agricultural products
  • Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin or Ether

Trading in these markets can happen both over-the-counter and in exchanges. 
In the traditional financial markets, there is an even broader range of financial derivatives, including forwards and swaps covering a variety of assets. However, in the cryptocurrency space, it’s the futures contract that currently reigns supreme. 

The Burgeoning Crypto-Derivative Market

A vast market for cryptocurrency derivatives has emerged over the last year or two. BitMEX first opened its doors in 2014, but the CME and the Cboe started offering bitcoin futures contracts to institutional clients in December 2017. The primary attraction in trading cryptocurrency derivatives is that the markets are more volatile. This volatility provides the opportunity for traders to realize far more significant gains than in traditional markets, which are more stable. Futures trading also provided the first means of going short on bitcoin. 
At this point in 2019, there are more exchanges to choose from if you want to trade cryptocurrency futures. BitMEX still dominates, but there are plenty of other choices, including Deribit, Bybit, and Cryptofacilities. Many existing cryptocurrency exchanges have expanded into futures too, including OKEx, Huobi and soon, Binance. 
Once Digitex launches, we aim for our zero-commission, decentralized futures exchange to outrank each of them on factors including fees, leverage, security, and liquidity. With the crypto futures markets at an all-time high, there’s no better time than now for new entrants to emerge. 
At the time of writing, the only exchange offering cryptocurrency options is Deribit. This makes the market for options far more limited than futures.  
At Digitex, we firmly believe that futures are the superior choice, particularly for more experienced and regular cryptocurrency traders. They were the first crypto-derivative to emerge, they provide the opportunity for the highest returns, and they have strong institutional and retail support. While the prospects for cryptocurrency options trading remain limited, liquidity will continue to be a challenge. Of course, things could change if more exchanges start offering options. 

Knowledge is Power

So, what about newcomers to the markets, or those who don’t trade so regularly? Well, there are no barriers to entry. However, newcomers to all kinds of trading should take steps to ensure they are educating themselves about the futures trading basics, such as types of instruments on offer and the markets for the underlying assets. 
It will also help to gain an understanding of the principles of technical and fundamental analysis which traders use to read and forecast market fluctuations. Furthermore, all traders, whether newcomers or the most experienced, should have an understanding of their own appetite for risk, and know when to exit a losing trade. 
Following these principles will serve you well, whether you choose to trade spot or derivatives, crypto or stocks, want to make a living trading futures or just trade for fun on the side, or engage in day trading or long term investing. If you want to learn more, the Digitex blog is a great place to start. We’ve published many informational articles which explain futures trading in-depth, covering jargon, strategy, analysis, trading versus investing, and much more. In trading as in life, knowledge is power. 
 
 

August 5, 2019
Digitex Futures
Trading

Futures vs. Options – Which Should You Trade?

Sarah Rothrie
Futures vs. Options - Which Should You Trade? 2

Futures and options are both financial derivatives traded by institutions and individuals, either to turn a profit or to hedge against current investments. Some traders like to trade both, while some have a preference for one over the other. When you weigh up your own trading choices between futures vs. options, you must understand the pros and cons of each. 
That’s where we come in. In this guide, we’ll deep-dive into the features of futures and options contracts, take a look at how they originated and how today’s traders across different markets use them. We’ll also compare the opportunities and risks of both stock futures trading and options contracts and examine the current state of the crypto-derivatives markets. 

What is a Futures Contract? 

When you hear the terms “futures” and “futures contract,” they mean one and the same thing. A futures contract is a simple legal agreement between two parties that a particular asset or commodity will be sold at a pre-agreed price on a specific date in the future. 
Futures are one of the oldest forms of derivatives, and their origins offer a simple way of explaining how futures work. Futures emerged as a means of farmers hedging against the future value of their crops. At the start of the growing season, the farmers couldn’t predict whether or not they would have a good or a bad harvest, as it would depend on factors such as the weather.
Similarly, imagine a baker buying the wheat from the farmer on the other side of the transaction – they were subject to the same uncertainty. So, the farmers and the bakers would agree on a price for the harvest at the start of the season.
According to the laws of supply and demand, a good harvest would increase supply, and push down the price of the wheat. Conversely, a poor harvest creates a shortage, driving demand, and wheat prices high. By entering into a futures contract, the farmers and the bakers could hedge their overall risk by agreeing on the harvest price upfront.
Although the markets have evolved, the nature of futures contracts remains the same. Today’s futures markets consist of hedgers and speculators. Hedgers are the parties with commodities or assets to sell who want to secure an agreed price. Speculators are those trade futures contracts against the value of the asset without ever planning to take custody of the asset itself. 
The financial markets are filled with jargon, so you may come across different terms and be left wondering “what are stock futures?” or “what are forex futures?” Rest assured that the explainer given here applies to any futures market, whether the underlying asset is stocks, fiat currencies, cryptocurrencies, or commodities like oil, metals, or utilities. 
So now that you’ve had a futures contract explained, how does an options contract work? 

What is an Options Contract?

A critical difference between futures and options is that an options contract doesn’t represent a legal agreement to buy or sell. An options contract creates a right, not an obligation, to enter into a trade before a fixed date at which the contract expires. 
Options contracts are of two types. A call option is a contract that allows the trader to buy a particular asset at a fixed price, called the strike price before the contract expires. Let’s say someone opens a call option to buy BTC at $10k with an expiry date at the end of 2020.
If BTC goes up to $15k, the trader can buy the BTC at $10k and immediately sell on the open market at $15k, realizing a $5k profit on the transaction. They could also sell the option contract itself, as it already represents a profit. 
The other type of option is a put option, which works in exactly the same way except it represents a sell transaction rather than a buy transaction. 
Like futures contracts, options contracts have a long and rich history, stretching all the way back to Ancient Greece. Aristotle provides a great example of options contracts in action at the time. He wrote of a poor philosopher called Thales, who made his wealth by forecasting the future year’s olive harvest. 
Thales made agreements with the olive press owners for the option to use their olive presses at a fixed value. The next year, there was a bountiful olive harvest. Due to the increased demand for olive presses, Thales was able to sell his “olive press options” for a profit.  

What is the Difference Between Futures and Options?

So, now we’ve covered the difference between futures and options on a mechanical level, what are the differences between future and options in a trading scenario?
Buying options offer a more conservative approach to trading. When buying options, the trader can never lose more than their initial investment, known as the premium. The premium value may vary depending on the difference between the option strike price and the actual asset price and the time left before the option expiry.
Regardless of whether the asset price falls way below the premium, the trader doesn’t lose any more than this value. This applies if they can’t sell the option and choose not to exercise their right to buy. 
The option seller faces far more risk, as they must honor the agreement to sell the options at the strike price. Selling (also called writing) options can lead to very high losses in volatile markets and are best left to the most experienced institutional options traders. 
Futures represent a legally binding agreement to buy an asset; therefore, they carry more risk as the trader cannot simply choose not to fulfill the trade. Furthermore, profits and losses are directly linked to the value of the asset with no premium to offset the downside. 
Conversely, though, trading futures offers the opportunity for far higher returns than trading options. Trading futures on margin amplifies the potential for even bigger profits, and losses, with futures trading. 
Options trading can be more complicated to understand than futures trading. However, once the basics are in place, options represent a solid choice for a newer trader. Because the risk exposure on a call option is limited to the premium paid, a trader can get away with understanding less about the market itself. 
On the other hand, experienced traders who know their markets well tend to opt for futures vs. options. If you’ve spent long enough understanding the markets for a particular asset, then you’re more likely to turn a bigger profit using leveraged futures contracts than with options. 

Markets for Futures and Options

You can trade futures and options across a wide variety of markets. These include:

  • Stocks such as Apple, Google or any publicly-traded company
  • Indices such as the S&P 500 or the DJI
  • Foreign currencies
  • Commodities such as precious metals, oil, and gas, or agricultural products
  • Cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin or Ether

Trading in these markets can happen both over-the-counter and in exchanges. 
In the traditional financial markets, there is an even broader range of financial derivatives, including forwards and swaps covering a variety of assets. However, in the cryptocurrency space, it’s the futures contract that currently reigns supreme. 

The Burgeoning Crypto-Derivative Market

A vast market for cryptocurrency derivatives has emerged over the last year or two. BitMEX first opened its doors in 2014, but the CME and the Cboe started offering bitcoin futures contracts to institutional clients in December 2017. The primary attraction in trading cryptocurrency derivatives is that the markets are more volatile. This volatility provides the opportunity for traders to realize far more significant gains than in traditional markets, which are more stable. Futures trading also provided the first means of going short on bitcoin. 
At this point in 2019, there are more exchanges to choose from if you want to trade cryptocurrency futures. BitMEX still dominates, but there are plenty of other choices, including Deribit, Bybit, and Cryptofacilities. Many existing cryptocurrency exchanges have expanded into futures too, including OKEx, Huobi and soon, Binance. 
Once Digitex launches, we aim for our zero-commission, decentralized futures exchange to outrank each of them on factors including fees, leverage, security, and liquidity. With the crypto futures markets at an all-time high, there’s no better time than now for new entrants to emerge. 
At the time of writing, the only exchange offering cryptocurrency options is Deribit. This makes the market for options far more limited than futures.  
At Digitex, we firmly believe that futures are the superior choice, particularly for more experienced and regular cryptocurrency traders. They were the first crypto-derivative to emerge, they provide the opportunity for the highest returns, and they have strong institutional and retail support. While the prospects for cryptocurrency options trading remain limited, liquidity will continue to be a challenge. Of course, things could change if more exchanges start offering options. 

Knowledge is Power

So, what about newcomers to the markets, or those who don’t trade so regularly? Well, there are no barriers to entry. However, newcomers to all kinds of trading should take steps to ensure they are educating themselves about the futures trading basics, such as types of instruments on offer and the markets for the underlying assets. 
It will also help to gain an understanding of the principles of technical and fundamental analysis which traders use to read and forecast market fluctuations. Furthermore, all traders, whether newcomers or the most experienced, should have an understanding of their own appetite for risk, and know when to exit a losing trade. 
Following these principles will serve you well, whether you choose to trade spot or derivatives, crypto or stocks, want to make a living trading futures or just trade for fun on the side, or engage in day trading or long term investing. If you want to learn more, the Digitex blog is a great place to start. We’ve published many informational articles which explain futures trading in-depth, covering jargon, strategy, analysis, trading versus investing, and much more. In trading as in life, knowledge is power. 
 
 

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A Basic Guide on How to Trade Futures 3

A Basic Guide on How to Trade Futures

Digitex Futures
Trading
• Sarah Rothrie
August 1, 2019

There was a time, not too long ago, when the only way to learn how to trade futures was by throwing yourself into a trading pit and just doing it. But traders today have a much better chance of success right out of the box. Why? Because the power of the internet means that longtime traders have the platforms to share their experiences and help beginners learn to trade futures – and win. Armed with a solid futures market education, even the newest of newbies can quickly start buying and selling alongside the top futures traders. 
In this article, we’ll walk through the basics of futures contracts and why futures are an excellent option for profitable trading. We’ll also cover the various futures markets, the art of choosing a trading platform and strategy, the benefits of investing in futures, and the mistakes to avoid for profitable futures trading. 

Futures Market Education 101 – About Futures

At the most basic level, a futures contract is a simple agreement to trade an asset at a defined point in the future, for an agreed price. In the first instance, futures emerged as a means of hedging against price fluctuations in the commodities markets. The first futures contracts were based on the agricultural markets, enabling farmers and their buyers to fix prices for harvests before the growing season started and protect against later market fluctuations.
Although commodities markets are still used by traders wanting to hedge on price, modern futures markets rely heavily on speculators. Speculators don’t want to take custody of the underlying asset; instead, they trade on price fluctuations. 
The presence of speculators created the futures markets as they exist today, in which futures contracts cover all kinds of assets beyond commodities. Futures are traded against stocks, indices, foreign currencies, and most recently, cryptocurrencies. 
Futures trading use margin and leverage to enhance the opportunity for profits. By borrowing funds from a broker or an exchange, you can magnify the potential for profits, although it also increases the risk exposure if the markets go against your trade.
Available leverage can vary widely between markets. For example, in the stock markets, leverage is limited to 2x, while in forex markets, it can be significantly higher.  In cryptocurrency futures markets, you can trade with up to 100x leverage. 
If you can learn how to trade futures successfully, they offer fantastic opportunities to make big money compared to other financial products or derivatives. For example, when trading options, there is better loss protection because you pay an up-front premium on an option. However, while options may offer less risk, futures offer a far greater potential for profitability. 
So now that we know all the basics of futures, how do you decide which futures to trade? 

Markets Overview – Which Are the Best Futures to Trade? 

Obviously, deciding on the best futures to trade will depend on the trader. Choosing which markets you want to enter will mean you need to determine your risk appetite and your available resources for trading.  You’ll also need to think about how much time you have for trading each day, which includes time spent on market analysis and evaluation of your results. 
For the beginner individual investor, cryptocurrencies provide some of the best futures trading opportunities. A single BTC or ETH can be split down into tiny increments, so there are very low barriers to entry.
Digitex will be the world’s first commission-free futures trading platform, making it viable to adopt a strategy of scalping profits from multiple lower-value trades. Furthermore, crypto exchanges don’t rely on profit-siphoning brokers, although most of them with the sole exception of Digitex do charge fees. 
The cryptocurrency markets are volatile, which is bad news for long-term investors. But it’s fantastic news for short-term traders in futures contracts, who can use leverage to magnify gains from the volatility. 
Among the rest, forex futures also offer some comparable benefits to cryptocurrency futures, in that you can trade with high leverage and some currencies are volatile enough to provide significant gains. Stocks and indices tend to be far less volatile and offer lower leverage. 

Which is the Best Futures Trading Platform? 

Once you’ve decided which type of markets you want to trade, then the next step is deciding where to trade futures. Many finance websites regularly provide detailed futures trading systems review for all the major platforms. 
However, here are the major points to consider when choosing a futures trading system:

Availability of product

There’s no point in choosing a platform only to find out it doesn’t sell what you want to buy.

Fees and commissions

These will directly eat into your profits. So, the lower the fees, the better your chances of turning a profit. 

User interface

Especially for a beginner, it should be relatively intuitive and easy to use. More advanced traders may appreciate access to more charts and technical analysis tools.

Customer service 

If something goes wrong, or if you get locked out of your trading account, shoddy customer service is the difference between a good trading day and a terrible trading day. 

Security 

If the platform gets hacked, your funds may be at risk. Particularly in the cryptocurrency space, high-profile exchange hacks are all too common. Make sure your chosen exchange places the highest emphasis on fund security.
More often than not, choosing a trading platform means making a trade-off on one or more of these points. At Digitex, we are taking pride in building an exchange that excels on every single one of these criteria.
When Digitex launches, it will be the only free futures trading system where you don’t pay a per-trade commission. That alone puts it in pole position for becoming the best futures trading platform. 
But there’s lots more. Users will have access to our intuitive, one-click ladder trading interface. And we’re currently in the process of setting up a world-class back office to ensure that traders can focus on one thing – trading. 

How to Trade Futures Successfully – Mistakes to Avoid

We will soon publish a post on trading strategies and choosing the best futures trading system that goes into far more detail about specific approaches. So, until then, here are some general tips on how to day trade futures online. 

Failing to Manage Your Emotions

Trading psychology is a topic all by itself. But it’s a fact that if you don’t manage your emotions effectively, you run the risk that they’ll eventually get the better of you.
It’s natural to feel fear if you hear bad news about the markets or think it’s worth hanging onto a position to wring a few more dollars out of it. But basing trading decisions on these feelings is a sure-fire route to losing money.
To successfully day trade futures online, stick to your plan, and leave the emotions out of it. As you learn to trade futures will get easier with experience. 

Deviating from Your Plan

So you’ve created a plan, tested and tested again and now you’re on the live markets. A few losing trades in, and it’s inevitable that you’ll start to question your plan.
While it makes sense in some situations to revisit a plan, especially if new information comes in, don’t feel you need to deviate from a tried and tested plan just because the market has a wobble. If you’re confident that you’ve done your research and testing correctly, hold your nerve and stick to the plan. 

Not Protecting Yourself

If you’re trading longer-term then you should always have a stop-loss in place for every trade. Unless you’re superhuman, it’s impossible to monitor the markets at all times. Especially in the world of cryptocurrency, where trading goes on 24/7, often at a breakneck speed.
A stop-loss will mean that even if the markets perform unexpectedly, you won’t be stuck in a losing position while you’re asleep. But conversely, there’s also danger in taking your eye off the markets. 

Taking Your Eye off the Markets

Although you can’t possibly watch the markets 24/7, top futures traders always keep an eye on the big picture and stay abreast of the news. Make sure you hone your analytical skills, learn to read charts and use technical tools, and if you incorporate all of this into your trading plan, you’ll start to see more good days than bad ones. 
So hopefully, by now, you’ll feel you know enough of the basics to start planning your entry to the futures market! Being a full-time trader is demanding and it’s not always easy to develop futures trading strategies that work, but it’s incredibly rewarding. 
Only DGTX holders will be able to trade on the Digitex Futures exchange, as all trades will be denominated in DGTX tokens. You can buy tokens from one of our exchange partners, or via the Digitex Treasury. Buying from the Treasury is trustless and instant, meaning there’s no price slippage. 

August 1, 2019
Digitex Futures
Trading

A Basic Guide on How to Trade Futures

Sarah Rothrie
A Basic Guide on How to Trade Futures 4

There was a time, not too long ago, when the only way to learn how to trade futures was by throwing yourself into a trading pit and just doing it. But traders today have a much better chance of success right out of the box. Why? Because the power of the internet means that longtime traders have the platforms to share their experiences and help beginners learn to trade futures – and win. Armed with a solid futures market education, even the newest of newbies can quickly start buying and selling alongside the top futures traders. 
In this article, we’ll walk through the basics of futures contracts and why futures are an excellent option for profitable trading. We’ll also cover the various futures markets, the art of choosing a trading platform and strategy, the benefits of investing in futures, and the mistakes to avoid for profitable futures trading. 

Futures Market Education 101 – About Futures

At the most basic level, a futures contract is a simple agreement to trade an asset at a defined point in the future, for an agreed price. In the first instance, futures emerged as a means of hedging against price fluctuations in the commodities markets. The first futures contracts were based on the agricultural markets, enabling farmers and their buyers to fix prices for harvests before the growing season started and protect against later market fluctuations.
Although commodities markets are still used by traders wanting to hedge on price, modern futures markets rely heavily on speculators. Speculators don’t want to take custody of the underlying asset; instead, they trade on price fluctuations. 
The presence of speculators created the futures markets as they exist today, in which futures contracts cover all kinds of assets beyond commodities. Futures are traded against stocks, indices, foreign currencies, and most recently, cryptocurrencies. 
Futures trading use margin and leverage to enhance the opportunity for profits. By borrowing funds from a broker or an exchange, you can magnify the potential for profits, although it also increases the risk exposure if the markets go against your trade.
Available leverage can vary widely between markets. For example, in the stock markets, leverage is limited to 2x, while in forex markets, it can be significantly higher.  In cryptocurrency futures markets, you can trade with up to 100x leverage. 
If you can learn how to trade futures successfully, they offer fantastic opportunities to make big money compared to other financial products or derivatives. For example, when trading options, there is better loss protection because you pay an up-front premium on an option. However, while options may offer less risk, futures offer a far greater potential for profitability. 
So now that we know all the basics of futures, how do you decide which futures to trade? 

Markets Overview – Which Are the Best Futures to Trade? 

Obviously, deciding on the best futures to trade will depend on the trader. Choosing which markets you want to enter will mean you need to determine your risk appetite and your available resources for trading.  You’ll also need to think about how much time you have for trading each day, which includes time spent on market analysis and evaluation of your results. 
For the beginner individual investor, cryptocurrencies provide some of the best futures trading opportunities. A single BTC or ETH can be split down into tiny increments, so there are very low barriers to entry.
Digitex will be the world’s first commission-free futures trading platform, making it viable to adopt a strategy of scalping profits from multiple lower-value trades. Furthermore, crypto exchanges don’t rely on profit-siphoning brokers, although most of them with the sole exception of Digitex do charge fees. 
The cryptocurrency markets are volatile, which is bad news for long-term investors. But it’s fantastic news for short-term traders in futures contracts, who can use leverage to magnify gains from the volatility. 
Among the rest, forex futures also offer some comparable benefits to cryptocurrency futures, in that you can trade with high leverage and some currencies are volatile enough to provide significant gains. Stocks and indices tend to be far less volatile and offer lower leverage. 

Which is the Best Futures Trading Platform? 

Once you’ve decided which type of markets you want to trade, then the next step is deciding where to trade futures. Many finance websites regularly provide detailed futures trading systems review for all the major platforms. 
However, here are the major points to consider when choosing a futures trading system:

Availability of product

There’s no point in choosing a platform only to find out it doesn’t sell what you want to buy.

Fees and commissions

These will directly eat into your profits. So, the lower the fees, the better your chances of turning a profit. 

User interface

Especially for a beginner, it should be relatively intuitive and easy to use. More advanced traders may appreciate access to more charts and technical analysis tools.

Customer service 

If something goes wrong, or if you get locked out of your trading account, shoddy customer service is the difference between a good trading day and a terrible trading day. 

Security 

If the platform gets hacked, your funds may be at risk. Particularly in the cryptocurrency space, high-profile exchange hacks are all too common. Make sure your chosen exchange places the highest emphasis on fund security.
More often than not, choosing a trading platform means making a trade-off on one or more of these points. At Digitex, we are taking pride in building an exchange that excels on every single one of these criteria.
When Digitex launches, it will be the only free futures trading system where you don’t pay a per-trade commission. That alone puts it in pole position for becoming the best futures trading platform. 
But there’s lots more. Users will have access to our intuitive, one-click ladder trading interface. And we’re currently in the process of setting up a world-class back office to ensure that traders can focus on one thing – trading. 

How to Trade Futures Successfully – Mistakes to Avoid

We will soon publish a post on trading strategies and choosing the best futures trading system that goes into far more detail about specific approaches. So, until then, here are some general tips on how to day trade futures online. 

Failing to Manage Your Emotions

Trading psychology is a topic all by itself. But it’s a fact that if you don’t manage your emotions effectively, you run the risk that they’ll eventually get the better of you.
It’s natural to feel fear if you hear bad news about the markets or think it’s worth hanging onto a position to wring a few more dollars out of it. But basing trading decisions on these feelings is a sure-fire route to losing money.
To successfully day trade futures online, stick to your plan, and leave the emotions out of it. As you learn to trade futures will get easier with experience. 

Deviating from Your Plan

So you’ve created a plan, tested and tested again and now you’re on the live markets. A few losing trades in, and it’s inevitable that you’ll start to question your plan.
While it makes sense in some situations to revisit a plan, especially if new information comes in, don’t feel you need to deviate from a tried and tested plan just because the market has a wobble. If you’re confident that you’ve done your research and testing correctly, hold your nerve and stick to the plan. 

Not Protecting Yourself

If you’re trading longer-term then you should always have a stop-loss in place for every trade. Unless you’re superhuman, it’s impossible to monitor the markets at all times. Especially in the world of cryptocurrency, where trading goes on 24/7, often at a breakneck speed.
A stop-loss will mean that even if the markets perform unexpectedly, you won’t be stuck in a losing position while you’re asleep. But conversely, there’s also danger in taking your eye off the markets. 

Taking Your Eye off the Markets

Although you can’t possibly watch the markets 24/7, top futures traders always keep an eye on the big picture and stay abreast of the news. Make sure you hone your analytical skills, learn to read charts and use technical tools, and if you incorporate all of this into your trading plan, you’ll start to see more good days than bad ones. 
So hopefully, by now, you’ll feel you know enough of the basics to start planning your entry to the futures market! Being a full-time trader is demanding and it’s not always easy to develop futures trading strategies that work, but it’s incredibly rewarding. 
Only DGTX holders will be able to trade on the Digitex Futures exchange, as all trades will be denominated in DGTX tokens. You can buy tokens from one of our exchange partners, or via the Digitex Treasury. Buying from the Treasury is trustless and instant, meaning there’s no price slippage. 

Latest News

Digitex vs the Futures Trading Competition - How Do We Measure Up? 5

Digitex vs the Futures Trading Competition – How Do We Measure Up?

Digitex Futures
Trading
• Sarah Rothrie
February 27, 2019

Whether you’re a crypto newbie or a seasoned trader, there are plenty of cryptocurrency exchanges to choose from. The vast majority of new traders enter through the gateway of one of the major fiat-to-crypto exchanges such as Coinbase. However, for those looking to earn a profit, trading derivatives like active futures contracts offer the potential of far higher returns. Continue reading

February 27, 2019
Digitex Futures
Trading

Digitex vs the Futures Trading Competition – How Do We Measure Up?

Sarah Rothrie
Digitex vs the Futures Trading Competition - How Do We Measure Up? 6

Whether you’re a crypto newbie or a seasoned trader, there are plenty of cryptocurrency exchanges to choose from. The vast majority of new traders enter through the gateway of one of the major fiat-to-crypto exchanges such as Coinbase. However, for those looking to earn a profit, trading derivatives like active futures contracts offer the potential of far higher returns. Continue reading

Latest News