Digitex dev update #1: Helpdesk improvement for handling clients' tickets 1

Digitex dev update #1: Helpdesk improvement for handling clients’ tickets

Digitex
• Digitex
July 16, 2021

One of our team’s biggest complaints was the helpdesk panel. Finding users’ orders and contracts was a painful task, as each trade may consist of multiple fills, price changes, and cancellations, and our data was not accumulated in one place.

Therefore, our support team often spent a lot of time getting an answer, especially when the order or contract was from a couple of days or weeks in the past.

In a nutshell, the helpdesk admin panel was not optimized. There hadn’t been a visual chain of trading data, which would significantly speed up the process and reduce errors.

We quickly realized how complicated it was to provide a quality service for our clients and how negatively affected their work was. Consequently, we decided to run a code refactoring to benefit our support staff, and ultimately, improve clients’ experience.

What solutions were implemented?

Every support staff now has a visual and straightforward history of each individual asset, besides what action has been taken by the user or the system. 

Moreover, there is now a one-click access to the users’ past trades, deposits, and withdrawals, balances and some other things (no worries, all sensitive data protected and nobody will not look at your trading activity history without your request). As a result, there’s no more time wasted on searching for information.

Lastly, the code refactoring allowed faster refresh times for the helpdesk admin page, translating to less waiting time from our users.

How long did it take to complete?

According to Dmytro Klymenko, Developer at Digitex, the whole process took two weeks from start to finish. Dmytro explained that the new code should go live during the weekend and be implemented on Monday.

Aleksei Veledinskii, the Product Owner at Digitex, explained that some changes in how each order and contract is handled could improve users’ experience in the future. For example, clients will be able to access this information directly from the platform.

What else can be done to improve clients’ support?

Dmytro explained that the first mission is to ensure that those changes are implemented and efficient from the helpdesk team perspective.

Only then, more changes can be attached, including new functionalities. 


Ref. What orders and contracts are?

Basically, the order means that you tell the system that you are going to sell or buy some amount of something. When Buy order and Sell order have the same price, they match and the Matching Engine creates the Trade object. But what if the price was the same, but quantity was different? 

Say, on the BTC/USDC Spot Market user A is going to sell 0.1 BTC for 3,200 USDC and user B is going to buy 0.07 BTC for 3,200 USDC. Engine will match orders, create trade for 0.07 BTC — but user A is still going to sell 0.03 BTC. So, his order will be automatically replaced with the same price but with a different quantity: 0.03 BTC instead of 0.1 BTC. We call it an order chain: the original order which was placed by the user can give birth to a new one in case of partial fill, new one can create another one and so on, until it will be filled or cancelled.

The similar flow exists on Futures Markets with Futures Contracts. Contracts which users can buy and sell on Digitex.io via Ladder UI have Quantity, Entry price and Margin fields. Let’s take the BTC/USD Futures Market with a contract nominated in DGTX. When you buy 1 contract with a $32,500 Entry price, the Matching Engine will create a position with 1 contract with Quantity 1, Entry price $32,500 and Margin 1,700 DGTX. 

When the user buys another contract with the same price, it will concatenate with the existing contract, so the Quantity will be 2 and Margin will be 3,400 DGTX. Behind the scenes it means that your original contract was replaced by a new one, and the new one was linked with the original one. Say, the user waits when the BTC price reaches $34,000 to sell his futures with profit. 

Each 8 hours on Digitex.io Exchange the Funding Event occurs. In some cases users who have opened long positions pay to users who have opened short positions from their Contract margin. In that case our user, if BTC doesn’t reached whished price within several hours, he will pay some DGTX from his contract margin, so the existing contract with Quantity 2, Entry price $32,500 and Margin 3,400 DGTX will be replaced by new contract with less Margin. As you may have mentioned, we call it the chain of contracts.

Looks difficult? Absolutely. That’s why we decided to add transparency on orders and contracts chains for our support agents.


We hope you guys enjoy our quick update and experience the improvements that are being done at Digitex.io.

Bye! See you next Friday with Dev update #2.

July 16, 2021
Digitex

Digitex dev update #1: Helpdesk improvement for handling clients’ tickets

Digitex
Digitex dev update #1: Helpdesk improvement for handling clients' tickets 2

One of our team’s biggest complaints was the helpdesk panel. Finding users’ orders and contracts was a painful task, as each trade may consist of multiple fills, price changes, and cancellations, and our data was not accumulated in one place.

Therefore, our support team often spent a lot of time getting an answer, especially when the order or contract was from a couple of days or weeks in the past.

In a nutshell, the helpdesk admin panel was not optimized. There hadn’t been a visual chain of trading data, which would significantly speed up the process and reduce errors.

We quickly realized how complicated it was to provide a quality service for our clients and how negatively affected their work was. Consequently, we decided to run a code refactoring to benefit our support staff, and ultimately, improve clients’ experience.

What solutions were implemented?

Every support staff now has a visual and straightforward history of each individual asset, besides what action has been taken by the user or the system. 

Moreover, there is now a one-click access to the users’ past trades, deposits, and withdrawals, balances and some other things (no worries, all sensitive data protected and nobody will not look at your trading activity history without your request). As a result, there’s no more time wasted on searching for information.

Lastly, the code refactoring allowed faster refresh times for the helpdesk admin page, translating to less waiting time from our users.

How long did it take to complete?

According to Dmytro Klymenko, Developer at Digitex, the whole process took two weeks from start to finish. Dmytro explained that the new code should go live during the weekend and be implemented on Monday.

Aleksei Veledinskii, the Product Owner at Digitex, explained that some changes in how each order and contract is handled could improve users’ experience in the future. For example, clients will be able to access this information directly from the platform.

What else can be done to improve clients’ support?

Dmytro explained that the first mission is to ensure that those changes are implemented and efficient from the helpdesk team perspective.

Only then, more changes can be attached, including new functionalities. 


Ref. What orders and contracts are?

Basically, the order means that you tell the system that you are going to sell or buy some amount of something. When Buy order and Sell order have the same price, they match and the Matching Engine creates the Trade object. But what if the price was the same, but quantity was different? 

Say, on the BTC/USDC Spot Market user A is going to sell 0.1 BTC for 3,200 USDC and user B is going to buy 0.07 BTC for 3,200 USDC. Engine will match orders, create trade for 0.07 BTC — but user A is still going to sell 0.03 BTC. So, his order will be automatically replaced with the same price but with a different quantity: 0.03 BTC instead of 0.1 BTC. We call it an order chain: the original order which was placed by the user can give birth to a new one in case of partial fill, new one can create another one and so on, until it will be filled or cancelled.

The similar flow exists on Futures Markets with Futures Contracts. Contracts which users can buy and sell on Digitex.io via Ladder UI have Quantity, Entry price and Margin fields. Let’s take the BTC/USD Futures Market with a contract nominated in DGTX. When you buy 1 contract with a $32,500 Entry price, the Matching Engine will create a position with 1 contract with Quantity 1, Entry price $32,500 and Margin 1,700 DGTX. 

When the user buys another contract with the same price, it will concatenate with the existing contract, so the Quantity will be 2 and Margin will be 3,400 DGTX. Behind the scenes it means that your original contract was replaced by a new one, and the new one was linked with the original one. Say, the user waits when the BTC price reaches $34,000 to sell his futures with profit. 

Each 8 hours on Digitex.io Exchange the Funding Event occurs. In some cases users who have opened long positions pay to users who have opened short positions from their Contract margin. In that case our user, if BTC doesn’t reached whished price within several hours, he will pay some DGTX from his contract margin, so the existing contract with Quantity 2, Entry price $32,500 and Margin 3,400 DGTX will be replaced by new contract with less Margin. As you may have mentioned, we call it the chain of contracts.

Looks difficult? Absolutely. That’s why we decided to add transparency on orders and contracts chains for our support agents.


We hope you guys enjoy our quick update and experience the improvements that are being done at Digitex.io.

Bye! See you next Friday with Dev update #2.

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